Faust and Twittamentary

Faust is a Russian film by Aleksandr Sokurov (Russian Ark), though it is mostly or entirely in German. I really don’t know how to describe it. After some establishing scenery shots (largely if not entirely CGI, but gorgeous nonetheless), the next shot is of a human penis, which is attached to a dead body being disassembled by Doctor Faust. The setting is medieval, with dirt, rats, and general filth. It pretty quickly becomes apparent that everyone is hungry, and in general you get a feeling of hopelessness.

Things get really weird. The other main character is a very strange old man. He is listed in the credits as the moneylender, but he is really (possible minor spoiler) the devil. Things get more and more surreal as the film proceeds. Some of it works, at least enough to keep me interested, but the whole didn’t quite measure up to the sum of the parts for me. I’ll give it  out of .

Twittamentary is a different film than I expected. It followed some stories (especially the homeless woman) through most of the film rather than being purely made up of short vignettes, and it didn’t cover the real Twitter celebrities, though they would be different today than when this was filmed (mostly 2009).

It was also a trip being encouraged to use our phones to tweet during the film, though I found I didn’t tweet every interesting point since it would take my attention away from the next story, and I’m glad that most movies do not encourage that. I didn’t learn all that much, but it was fun, and I would give it  out of . An earlier showing of the film at the festival was the North American premiere.

There was a short Q&A with the director, Siok Siok Tan (a.k.a., @sioksiok) after the film (there may be spoilers here, if a documentary can have spoilers):

  • She originally hoped and expected to make a global film and to cover more Twitter celebrities, but she likes what it turned out to be
  • One story that didn’t make it was about an ex-con who wants to help keep young people out of prison
  • The road trip was in late 2009
  • The song guy was @ihatemornings, and the songs were all written in one hour
  • There was a possible story about a woman tweeting through childbirth, which might have counterbalanced the death story well

The film was preceded by a comedic short called “Zoltan: The Hungarian Gangster of Love,” which was pretty fun. I’ll give it  out of .

Both seen on 3/4/2012 at Cinequest.

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